Farm News


I’m just back from taking a tromp around the muddy-snowy-icy gardens. I’m going to have to get out there soon and start doing some clean-up, but not today. I did pull a few old bean vines off a trellis, but that hardly counts in the grand scheme of clean-up. Besides, I’m still working on the basement.

I did manage to sell my Earthway one-row garden seeder on Craigslist–so that’s one more thing gone (or will be as soon as I can find the right-sized box to ship it). I bought it about three years ago and have never used it. Soon after, I decided that wider beds would be the way to go, and the seeder just wasn’t feasible for the kind of format I was looking to do.

There are a few signs of life out in the sloppy gardens–many of the strawberries I transplanted last fall look to be alive and healthy. The green onions still have a little green at their bases, and I may move them this year to a spot closer to the edge of the garden. Why not put a hardy perennial that’s unpalatable to deer or rabbits along the perimeter?

The wild garden kales I covered with wire cages and row cover don’t look so hot, but they may make a comeback once things warm up and the days get longer. The Red Russian kale that made it through last winter without cover still seems viable. Can they really live more than two years? We’ll see.

Overall, I’ve certainly got my work cut out for me. There are so many projects just to get ready for serious spring planting–chopping down the old broccoli and eggplant, pulling the tomato vines from their trellises and relocating some trellises to the north-central garden (once I even decide which trellises need to move).

But the longer days and warmer weather have a way of making the metaphorical sap rise in my veins and make me hopeful in spite of all the work ahead.

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One response to this post.

  1. Oh, that the garden were visible in this area – still snow covered. But the temps hit 50 today and the snow’s melting. I’m itching to get my fingers in the dirt.

    I’m thinking that garden work multiplies mysteriously over the winter – it seems that way anyway.

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